Earth System Knowledge Platform (ESKP)

ESKP (Earth System Knowledge Platform) is the knowledge platform of the Research Field Earth and Environment of the Helmholtz Association. The platform is supported by eight Helmholtz Centres.

ESKP (Earth System Knowledge Platform) is the knowledge platform of the Research Field Earth and Environment of the Helmholtz Association. The platform is supported by eight Helmholtz Centres:

  • AWI: Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research
  • DLR: German Aerospace Center
  • FZJ: Forschungszentrum Jülich
  • GEOMAR: GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel
  • GFZ: Helmholtz Centre Potsdam – German Research Centre for Geosciences
  • HZG: Helmholtz Centre Geesthacht, Centre for Materials and Coastal Research
  • KIT: Karlsruhe Institute of Technology
  • UFZ: Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research

The platform is coordinated at Helmholtz Centre Potsdam – German Research Centre for Geosciences.

The eskp.de website vividly conveys knowledge on the central topics of natural hazards, climate change, pollutants and the effects of the energy turnaround on the environment in the form of scientific articles, interviews, video clips, science GIFs, information graphics and more.

ESKP processes research findings for society. The range of expertise in the Research Area Earth and Environment allows complex topics to be examined from different perspectives and to be presented as a whole, in particular via the format of the “Themenspezial” (currently only in German). The contributions also point out open questions as an impulse back into the science community and provide action options. The aim is to improve the basis for decision-making in politics and society.

Scientific examination at ESKP

The editorial staff of the Helmholtz Knowledge Platform Earth and Environment ESKP is guided by the high quality standards of the Helmholtz Association. As a rule, scientists from the research centres publish on ESKP in the form of name or opinion contributions. Natural science orientated contributions prepared by the ESKP editorial staff are reviewed by researchers of the Helmholtz Association from the respective field of knowledge. All articles are marked accordingly to ensure the best possible transparency regarding authorship and professional participation.

By disseminating verifiable and comprehensible information, ESKP aims to contribute to the free formation of opinion and offer users a reliable source of information.

Earth System Knowledge Platform (ESKP)

Contact

Earth System Knowledge Platform (ESKP)
c/o Helmholtz-Zentrum Potsdam
Deutsches GeoForschungsZentrum
Telegrafenberg
14473 Potsdam

Phone:
+49 (0)331 288 1037
Mail:
eskp@gfz-potsdam.de
Web:
https://www.eskp.de

Earth System Knowledge Platform (ESKP)

Pressemitteilungen

Earth System Knowledge Platform (ESKP)

Partners

ESKP
The centres involved in ESKP are active in numerous alliances, advisory offices, cross-cutting research projects and initiatives from regional to global level. Find out more in the centre information boxes under the tab "Alliances" on this page.

Alfred-Wegener-Institute, Helmholtz-Centre for Polar and Marine Research (AWI)

From the Arctic ice to the bottom of the oceans: Helmholtz scientists working at the Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research (AWI) in Bremerhaven study the poles, the oceans and the climate. Their research often takes them along exciting and hazardous routes. Their goal is to unravel the changes - partly natural and partly caused by humans - taking place in the global environment and in System Earth.

Unravelling hidden messages in the oceans and in the ice

From the Arctic ice to the bottom of the oceans: Helmholtz scientists working at the Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research (AWI) in Bremerhaven study the poles, the oceans and the climate. Their research often takes them along exciting and hazardous routes. Their goal is to unravel the changes - partly natural and partly caused by humans - taking place in the global environment and in System Earth.

The AWI works in the following three scientific topic fields

  • Geoscientists at the Alfred Wegener Institute are reconstructing the history of the polar continents and seas. They study sedimentation history, the processes of deposition and geological transformation in the oceans, marine bio-geochemical cycles, and the paleoclimate of the polar regions. Glaciologists are working on the reconstruction of climate history from ice cores, researching the mass balance and the dynamcis of the large ice masses in Greenland and the Antarctic, as well as their interactions with the global climate. Seismic measurements and the identification of anomalies in the Earth's gravitational and magnetic field provide the scientists with valuable information about the structure of the Arctic and Antarctic continental shelfs. Atmospheric chemists at AWI are unravelling the chemical processes in the troposphere and stratosphere that determine our environment.
  • The division Bioscience deals with ecological, physiological and ecotoxicological topics. Shelf and coastal waters of the polar seas as well as coastal waters of the North Sea are the areas of major interest. Central themes are the reactions of cells, individuals, populations and communities towards external influences, and organisation and dynamics of populations, communities and ecosystems.
  • Studies in the Climate Science department of the Alfred Wegener Institute focus on the coupled ocean-ice-atmosphere system and its importance for the global climate. AWI researchers conduct field measurements and numerical simulations related to oceanic circulation, transport of substances and energy in polar seas and the polar atmosphere, as well as related to the influence of these processes on the global climate system. Oceanographic studies concentrate on the modification of water masses in the Weddell and North Polar Seas and on the spreading of deep and bottom waters into the world ocean. Atmospheric studies focus on the investigation of climate relevant processes on different scales in space and time. In addition, variations in the concentration of climate-forcing trace gases and aerosols and their impact on the Earth's radiation balance are investigated.

Scientific research with an icebreaker

Their research work often takes the Helmholtz scientists from Bremerhaven out to sea or even direct to the ice at the North and South Poles. An icebreaker serves as their No. 1 mobile research platform: The research and supply ship "Polarstern". Research stations in the Arctic and Antarctic make it possible to take meteorological and geophysical measurements all year round. In addition, the Helmholtz Centre operates three research ships which study more moderate climes, as well as two polar aircraft.

The AWI has a total of 778 staff and its head office in Bremerhaven. This Helmholtz Centre also maintains a Research Institute in Potsdam (Forschungsstelle Potsdam), a Biological Institute on Helgoland (Biologische Anstalt Helgoland - BAH) and a Tideland Station on Sylt (Wattenmeerstation Sylt).

In addition to performing basic and applied research, the AWI also plays a coordinating role, offers advice and consultancy, and provides special services. These responsibilities focus on biological monitoring, on providing scientific-technical support for German polar research, and on giving advice to the German government.

ESKP Research Topic:
Natural Hazards Climate Change

Alfred-Wegener-Institute, Helmholtz-Centre for Polar and Marine Research (AWI)

Contact the AWI

Alfred-Wegener-Institute, Helmholtz-Centre for Polar and Marine Research (AWI)
Am Handelshafen 12
27570 Bremerhaven

Dr. Gesche Krause
Coordination ESKP@AWI
Phone: +49 471 4831-1631

Jacqueline Martin
Office Communication Department

Phone:
+49 (0)471 4831-1112
Mail:
info@awi.de
Web:
http://www.awi.de/en/science/special-groups/eskp.html

Alfred-Wegener-Institute, Helmholtz-Centre for Polar and Marine Research (AWI)

Pressemitteilungen

Alfred-Wegener-Institute, Helmholtz-Centre for Polar and Marine Research (AWI)

Partners

AWI North Sea Office
The AWI North Sea Office communicates scientific knowledge to policy, conservation agencies and the public. The North Sea is a unique natural region and important economic region. The resultant conflicts of interest together with climate change are a major challenge to politics and authorities.

At the sites in Bremerhaven, Helgoland and Sylt the AWI is investigating the ongoing changes in the North Sea since many years. Due to their extensive expert knowledge from numerous research projects and environmental observation programs AWI scientists are engaged in national and European advisory boards. Together with politics and nature conservation agencies the AWI is developing strategies for a sustainable management of a changing North Sea.

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Climate Office for Polar Regions and Sea Level Rise
The objective of the Climate Office for Polar Regions and Sea Level Rise is to bundle research results on climate change for the Polar Regions as well as to prepare and communicate them in comprehensible fashion. The Climate Office is furthering this important process of communication from the scientific community to the various segments of our society through various projects.

To reduce or avoid the impacts of climate change is one of the biggest challenges we face as a global community in the 21st century. Climate change strongly affects human life, society, and economy with regionally very different implications. As awareness of the potential regional impacts of climate change grows, the demand for more detailed information is also growing. Whether society is able or unable to adapt to a changing climate on time will be highly dependent on credible and effective communication of scientific research results to decision-makers, policy planners and a broad public. Sufficient information at the right time is needed to ensure that the best policy and adaptation decisions can be made, and practical solutions can be developed. A worldwide network of regionally specified climate offices facilitates the communication between the actors and will substantially contribute to decision-making processes in politics, economics, and society. 

Climate on Earth is a complex system composed of several 'spheres', such as the atmosphere or the oceans. These spheres are closely connected in many ways. An understanding of Earth's climate requires knowledge on the individual spheres and their relationship among each other as well as on the factors that influence the climate. Nowhere is climate change more strongly expressed than in the polar regions which even respond to small changes in climate. In this context, the research profile of the Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research in the Helmholtz Association provides a unique research expertise. 

The established climate office will facilitate and enhance the collection, dissemination, and use of valuable information from the institute's many climate-related polar research topics for the benefit of a wide national and international audience, such as public officials and organizations, corporations, and private citizens. This is especially important given that climate change and variability has emerged as a major public policy issue over the last decade, particularly with regard to impacts in sectors where the economic, social/cultural, and public health consequences are large. 

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Meereisportal
Sea ice plays an important role in the Earth's climate system. The "Meereisportal" provides background information and expert knowledge. (only in German)

Das Meereis der Polargebiete Arktis und Antarktis bedeckt circa 7 Prozent der Erde. Der Einfluss dieses Gebietes auf das globale Klima ist groß. Meereis steuert insbesondere den Wärme- und Süßwasseraustausch der polaren Ozeane und spielt somit eine entscheidende Rolle im Klimasystem der Erde. Struktur, Volumen und Flächenausdehnung von Meereis sind außerordentlich differenziert und variabel. Aufgrund dieser physikalischen Eigenschaften besitzt Meereis einen erheblichen Einfluss auf den Energiehaushalt der Erdoberfläche. Meereis ist ein sehr komplexes Gebilde und gehört gleichzeitig zu einem der interessantesten und einflussreichsten Materialien auf unserem Planeten. Zudem ist es ein besonders faszinierender Lebensraum, unerlässlich für das Ökosystem der Polargebiete.

meereisportal.de ist eine Initiative des Alfred-Wegener-Instituts (AWI), Helmholtz Zentrum für Polar- und Meeresforschung, in Kooperation mit der Universität Bremen (Institut für Umweltphysik). Alle wichtigen und aktuellen Informationen rund um das Thema Meereis werden zusammengetragen und  der Öffentlichkeit zur Verfügung gestellt. Das Portal bietet hierfür umfangreiche Hintergrundinformationen, aufbereitetes Datenmaterial sowie den direkten Zugriff auf die Datenbasis.

meereisportal.de ist ein offenes Portal und steht für alle wissenschaftlichen Gruppen, die im Bereich Meereis forschen, als Plattform für die Informationsvermittlung ihrer Forschungsergebnisse zur Verfügung. 

meereisportal.de bietet für den Nutzer den großen Vorteil, direkten Zugang zu verschiedenen Daten aus der Meereisbeobachtung und Forschung zu erhalten.

Die Wissensplattform meereisportal.de besitzt drei tragende Säulen:

·         Hintergrundinformationen
·         Karten- und Datenarchiv
·         Expertenwissen

Die erste Säule der neuen Webplattform verfolgt vorrangig das Ziel, umfangreiche und verständlich aufbereitete Informationen über das Thema Meereis in deutscher Sprache anzubieten. Fragen wie "Wie entsteht Meereis?", "Wie wird es erforscht?" oder "Welche Rolle spielt es für das Klima unserer Erde?" werden auf der neuen deutschsprachigen Wissensplattform, in unterschiedlichen Vertiefungs- und Detaillierungsgraden, beantwortet.

Eine weitere Säule stellt das umfangreiche Karten- und Datenarchiv dar, in dem momentan für die vergangenen zehn Jahre  mehr als 7.000 grafisch aufbereitete Meereiskarten und die dazugehörigen Daten für die eigene Weiterverarbeitung heruntergeladen werden können. Seit September 2013 werden in diesem Portal auch die weltweit ersten Karten zur Meereisdicke als Datenprodukte des ESA-Satelliten CryoSat-2 veröffentlicht.

Die dritte wichtige Säule stellt das  Expertenwissen beider Partnerinstitutionen zu unterschiedlichen Themenbereichen des Meereises dar. Dieses bildet das Fundament der Wissensplattform und fließt in alle Bereiche des Portals ein. Daraus ergeben sich verschiedene maßgebliche Qualitätsmerkmale für die Plattform. So werden beispielsweise die Meereismessungen begleitenden Bewertungen und Einschätzungen direkt durch die Experten vorgenommen. Darüber hinaus stehen diese auch als Ansprechpartner für Fragen zur Verfügung. Zusätzlich wird durch die direkte Anknüpfung an wissenschaftliche Fragestellungen bei den in meereisportal.de dargestellten Themen eine hohe Aktualität gewährleistet. Von Meereisphysikern über Ozeanographen bis hin zu Meereismodellierern – sie alle werden auf meereisportal.de zu Wort kommen und verdeutlichen, auf welch vielfältige Art und Weise die Wissenschaft das Meereis untersucht und zu welchen Themen sie Auskunft geben können.

Auf meereisportal.de finden darüber hinaus auch die am AWI zum Thema Meereis durchgeführten Expeditionen eine berichterstattende Heimat. Ein erster Schritt in diese Richtung wurde bereits realisiert. Die zweimonatige Winterexpedition der "FS Polarstern", die am 8. Juni 2013 startete, wurde mit aktuellen Bildern, Berichten und Hintergrundinformationen auf meereisportal.de dokumentiert und so einer breiten Öffentlichkeit zugänglich gemacht.

 Mehr

Office for information and cooperation in the Arctic
The German Arctic Office at the Alfred Wegener Institute Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research serves as an information and cooperation platform for German stakeholders invested in Arctic science, politics and industry. It enhances the visibility of Germany‘s engagement in the Arctic on a national and international level.

The German Arctic Office is active in policy advice, it runs an information platform and organizes forums and events.

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German Aerospace Center (DLR)

What useful information can satellites give us for monitoring the environment and disaster management? What can we discover about the origins and development of the universe? How can we generate power in a way that is both efficient and environmentally friendly? What concepts and technologies can we use to make land, sea and air travel compatible with the environment? These are just some of the questions that scientists at the German Aerospace Center (DLR) in Cologne are trying to answer. DLR pools federal and state funding and resources for research and development in the fields of air and space travel, transport and selected energy sectors. As Germany’s national space agency, DLR is responsible for realising the German government’s space agenda.

Moving into the future

What useful information can satellites give us for monitoring the environment and disaster management? What can we discover about the origins and development of the universe? How can we generate power in a way that is both efficient and environmentally friendly? What concepts and technologies can we use to make land, sea and air travel compatible with the environment? These are just some of the questions that scientists at the German Aerospace Center (DLR) in Cologne are trying to answer. DLR pools federal and state funding and resources for research and development in the fields of air and space travel, transport and selected energy sectors. As Germany’s national space agency, DLR is responsible for realising the German government’s space agenda.

Research and development at DLR focuses on crucial technologies for the 21st century. Its role encompassing everything from defining suitable sensors to data reception and use, the DLR space research programme contributes significantly to the ongoing development of European satellite launcher systems and itself conducts earth observation of the Earth using satellites. Other important challenges for the future include the development of quieter, low-emission aircraft that still offer high performance and of new propulsion and combustion technologies, and maximising the use and efficiency of solar energy. The centre is at the vanguard of R&D work in new key technologies such as adaptronics, mechatronics and intelligent materials, and advances the use of simulation processes and the further development of software and data management.

With state-of-the-art testing facilities and research aircraft at its disposal, DLR is able to act as a driving force in joint European efforts to tackle these challenges.

Technological basis for economic competitiveness

DLR is helping to build and maintain a technological basis that will keep Germany competitive at an international level. It works in close cooperation with industry, allowing the results of its research to be transferred into practical applications quickly; its partnerships with innovative medium-sized businesses are particularly important.

DLR has 7,700 employees in 16 locations, including Cologne (head office), Berlin, Bremen, Braunschweig, Göttingen, Lampoldshausen, Oberpfaffenhofen and Stuttgart. DLR is involved in several international testing sites and has liaison offices in Brussels, Paris and Washington.

ESKP Research Topic:
Natural Hazards

German Aerospace Center (DLR)

Contact the DLR

German Aerospace Center (DLR)
Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt
Linder Höhe
51147 Köln

Andreas Schütz
Corporate Communications spokesman

Phone:
+49 (0)2203 601-2474
Mail:
andreas.schuetz@dlr.de
Web:
http://www.dlr.de

German Aerospace Center (DLR)

Pressemitteilungen

German Aerospace Center (DLR)

Partners

Center for Satellite Based Crisis Information
The Center for Satellite Based Crisis Information (ZKI) presents a service of the German Remotes Sensing Data Center (DFD) at DLR. It provides a 24/7 service for the rapid provision, processing and analysis of satellite imagery during natural and environmental disasters, for humanitarian relief activities and civil security issues worldwide.

The Center for Satellite Based Crisis Information (ZKI) presents a service of the German Remotes Sensing Data Center (DFD) at DLR. It provides a 24/7 service for the rapid provision, processing and analysis of satellite imagery during natural and environmental disasters, for humanitarian relief activities and civil security issues worldwide. The resulting satellite based information products are provided to relief organisations and public authorities and are also freely available on the ZKI website. According to the requirements of the user, the information products are delivered in the form of maps, GIS-ready geodata or dossiers which are then used to support disaster management operations, humanitarian relief activities or civil security issues.

The rising number of natural disasters, humanitarian emergency situations and threats to the civil society increases the demand for timely and precise information on many different types of scenarios and situations. ZKI uses all kinds of satellite imagery for the extraction of relevant crisis information like flood extent, damaged infrastructure, endangered population or evacuation areas, just to name a few examples. Besides response and assessment activities, ZKI derives geoinformation products for the use in medium term rehabilitation, reconstruction and crisis prevention activities. It operates in national and international context, closely networking with German public authorities at national and state level, non-governmental organisations, satellite operators and space agencies. In order to continuously improve service and products, ZKI cooperates very closely with relief organisations and provides training and consulting for field practitioners, situation center staff and decision makers.

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Forschungszentrum Jülich (FZJ)

Forschungszentrum Jülich makes a vital contribution to solving major challenges facing society in the fields of information, energy, and bioeconomy. It focuses on the future of information technologies and information processing, complex processes in the human brain, the transformation of the energy system, and a sustainable bioeconomy. Forschungszentrum Jülich develops simulation and data sciences as a key research method and makes use of large, often unique, scientific infrastructures. With some 5,900 employees and about 800 visiting scientists per year from 75 countries, it is one of Europe's large research centres.

Forschungszentrum Jülich focuses on use-inspired basic research. It adopts an interdisciplinary approach and investigates relations between research areas energy, information, and sustainable bioeconomy.

Information

Increasing digitalisation requires and enables innovations in high-performance computing, scientific simulation and big data as well as future technologies such as quantum computing and neuromorphic computing. The coding of information in molecular biology structures such as proteins or neuronal information processing in the human brain are also investigated by Jülich scientists. Understanding the complex processes in the brain is the prerequisite for better diagnosis and treatment of brain diseases.

Energy

The aim of the energy transition is a secure, affordable and environmentally friendly energy supply. Research focuses on renewable energies, combined with questions of transformation and storage as well as the interactions of the energy system with the atmosphere and the climate. This requires a systemic linking of the value-added chains, for example from power generation using photovoltaics to storage and reconversion.

Future area Bioeconomy

Structural change from an oil-based to a bio-based economy will gain in importance as a strategic topic of the future. For this reason, sustainable bioeconomy, that is, research into new value chains based on plant raw materials, is being expanded.

ESKP Research Topic:
Climate Change Pollutants

Forschungszentrum Jülich (FZJ)

Contact the FZJ

Forschungszentrum Jülich (FZJ)
Wilhelm-Johnen-Straße
52428 Jülich

Annette Stettien
Head External Communications
Deputy Press Spokesperson

Phone:
+49 (0)2461 61-2388 or -8031
Mail:
a.stettien@fz-juelich.de
Web:
http://www.fz-juelich.de

Forschungszentrum Jülich (FZJ)

Pressemitteilungen

Forschungszentrum Jülich (FZJ)

Partners

Reinisches Institut für Umweltforschung
Aufgabe des Rheinischen Instituts für Umweltforschung (RIU) ist die Durchführung und Förderung von Forschungs- und Entwicklungsvorhaben in allen Bereichen, die für die Umwelt von Bedeutung sind.

Aufgabe des Rheinischen Instituts für Umweltforschung (RIU) ist die Durchführung und Förderung von Forschungs- und Entwicklungsvorhaben in allen Bereichen, die für die Umwelt von Bedeutung sind. Das Institut arbeitet eng mit der Universität zu Köln zusammen. Es wird durch einen Förderverein getragen, dem vor allem Mitglieder der Hochschule, darüber hinaus aber auch andere engagierte Umweltwissenschaftler angehören. Der Förderverein und das Institut sind eine gemeinnützige Einrichtung.

Das Schwergewicht der Arbeiten von RIU bilden derzeit Projekte der atmosphärischen Umweltforschung. In Zusammenarbeit mit der Universität zu Köln und dem Forschungszentrum Jülich wurde ein regionales Modell zur Behandlung von Fragen der Luftreinhaltung entwickelt. Es handelt sich um das EURAD-Modell-System (EURAD: Europäisches Ausbreitungs- und Depositionsmodell). Mit ihm werden sowohl europaweite als auch lokale Fragen der Luftbelastung bearbeitet. Ozon, saure Substanzen ("saurer Regen") und atmosphärisches Aerosol (u. a. Staub) sind die vom Menschen erzeugten Luftbeimengungen, die im Zentrum der Forschung der Atmosphärengruppe stehen.

Es wurden ferner Untersuchungen über den Einfluss des Luftverkehrs auf die Zusammensetzung der untersten Stratosphäre und dessen mögliche Bedeutung für die Veränderung der Ozonschicht durchgeführt.

RIU liefert außer Beiträgen zur Forschung auch Beiträge zur Bewertung von Umweltänderungen und zur Planung von Maßnahmen zum Schutz der Umwelt.

Helmholtz-Centre for Ocean Research Kiel

GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research is the successor of the Leibniz Institute of Marine Sciences (IFM-GEOMAR) which was founded in January 2004 through the merger of the Institut für Meereskunde (IfM) and the Research Center for Marine Geosciences (GEOMAR). The institute is a member of the Helmholtz Association and employs more than 850 scientific and technical staff.

The institutes’ mandate is the interdisciplinary investigation of all relevant aspects of modern marine sciences, from sea floor geology to marine meteorology. Research is conducted worldwide in all oceans. 

The institute has four major research divisions:

  • Ocean Circulation and Climate Dynamics
  • Marine Biogeochemistry
  • Marine Ecology
  • Dynamics of the Ocean Floor.

In addition, GEOMAR contributes to the Cluster of Excellence "The Future Ocean" and the collaborative research centres, SFB 574 "Volatiles and Fluids in Subducton Zones" and SFB754: "Climate-Biogeochemistry Interactions in the Tropical Ocean", funded by the German Science Foundation (DFG). 

GEOMAR cooperates closely with the University of Kiel in the education of future marine scientists. Bachelor curricula include “Physics of the Earth System: Meteorology – Oceanography – Geophysics” and internationally oriented Master courses such as “Climate Physics: Meteorology and Physical Oceanography” and “Biological Oceanography.” Additional contributions to other curricula such as Geology and Geophysics are also provided. GEOMAR also has cooperative programmes with other universities around the world. Special programmes for pupils and teachers aim to stimulate interest in the marine sciences at an early stage. 

In addition, the institute operates four research vessels, state-of-the-art equipment such as the manned submersible JAGO, the deep-sea robots ROV KIEL6000, PHOCA and ABYSS as well as several major laboratories, access to high performance computing facilities and an attractive public aquarium. 

GEOMAR is one of three leading institutions in the field of marine sciences in Europe. In addition to number of international partner institutions, GEOMAR together with the National Oceanography Centre in the United Kingdom and Ifremer in France has formed the “G3 group” of national marine research centres. 

GEOMAR cooperates with a number of small companies active in marine technology and science, partly founded by former staff members of the institute.

GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel

Wischhofstr. 1-3
24148 Kiel

+49 431 600-0
+49 431 600-2805
presse(at)geomar.de
http://www.geomar.de

ESKP Research Topic:
Natural Hazards Climate Change

Helmholtz-Centre for Ocean Research Kiel

Contact the GEOMAR

Helmholtz-Centre for Ocean Research Kiel (GEOMAR)
Wischhofstr. 1-3
24148 Kiel

Communication and Media

Phone:
+49 (0)431 600-2809
Mail:
presse@geomar.de
Web:
http://www.geomar.de

Helmholtz-Centre for Ocean Research Kiel

Pressemitteilungen

Helmholtz-Centre for Ocean Research Kiel

Helmholtz Centre Potsdam - German Research Centre for Geosciences (GFZ)

The future can only be secured by those who understand the System Earth and its interactions with Man: We develop a profound understanding of systems and processes of the solid Earth together with strategies and options for action to address global change and its regional impacts, to understand natural hazards and to minimize associated risks, as well as to assess the human impact on System Earth.

The GFZ is Germany’s national research center for the solid Earth Sciences. Our mission is to deepen the knowledge of the dynamics of the solid Earth, and to develop solutions for grand challenges facing society. These challenges include anticipating the hazards arising from the Earth’s dynamic systems and mitigating the associated risks to society; securing our habitat under the pressure of global change; and supplying energy and mineral resources for a rapidly growing population in a sustainable manner and without harming the environment.

These challenges are inextricably linked with the dynamics of planet Earth, not just the solid Earth and the surface on which we live, but also the hydrosphere, atmosphere, and biosphere, and the chemical, physical, and biological processes that connect them. Hence, we view our planet as a system with interacting components. We investigate the structure and history of the Earth, its properties, and the dynamics of its interior and surface, and we use our fundamental understanding to develop solutions needed to maintain planet Earth as a safe and supportive habitat.

In pursuit of our mission, we have developed a comprehensive spectrum of expertise in geodesy, geophysics, geology, mineralogy, geochemistry, physics, geomorphology, geobiosciences, mathematics, and engineering. This is complemented by our deep methodological and technological knowhow and innovation. We are responsible for the long-term operation of expansive instrument networks, arrays and observatories, as well as data and analytical infrastructures. To accomplish our large-scale tasks, we have established MESI, the worldwide unique Modular Earth Science Infrastructure.

 

We coordinate our science through five Research Units:

  • Global Processes – Integrated monitoring and modelling: How are linked processes controlling the global dynamics of the Earth and change in the Earth System?
  • Plate Boundary Systems – Understanding the dynamics that affect the human habitat: How do the dynamic processes of the solid Earth’s most dynamic systems function and how do they control related hazards and resource formation?
  • Earth Surface and Climate Interactions – Probing records to constrain mechanisms and sensitivities: How does climate change today and in the past affect the Earth surface and how do surface processes, in turn, influence the atmosphere and climate?
  • Natural Hazards – Understanding risks and safeguarding the human habitat: How can we better predict and understand natural hazards, their dynamics, and their consequences?
  • Georesources and Geoenergy – Raw materials and contributions to the energy transition: How can georesources and the geological subsurface be used in a sustainable way?

 

ESKP Research Topic:
Natural Hazards Climate Change

Helmholtz Centre Potsdam - German Research Centre for Geosciences (GFZ)

Contact the GFZ

Helmholtz Centre Potsdam - German Research Centre for Geosciences (GFZ)
Telegrafenberg
14473 Potsdam

Josef Zens
Head of public relations and media relations

Phone:
+49 (0)331 288 1040
Mail:
josef.zens@gfz-potsdam.de
Web:
http://www.gfz-potsdam.de

Helmholtz Centre Potsdam - German Research Centre for Geosciences (GFZ)

Pressemitteilungen

Helmholtz Centre Potsdam - German Research Centre for Geosciences (GFZ)

Partners

GEOFOrschungsNetz
GEOFON (GEOFOrschungsNetz) is the global seismological broad-band network operated by the German GeoForschungsZentrum (GFZ).

The GEOFON seismic network came into being in 1993 as one of the three pillars of the GEOFON program dedicated to Ernst von Rebeur-Paschwitz, proposer of a global earthquake monitoring system, who recorded the first teleseismic seismogram in Potsdam in 1889. The program and its seismic network were created to provide high quality broad-band data for scientific use and foster common standards in the seismological community. The network has evolved towards real-time data acquisition and distribution while keeping the high quality broad-band data in focus. Today the network plays a leading role in global real-time seismology providing valuable data for almost all fundamental and applied global/regional seismological research projects at GFZ and the wider seismological community. The GEOFON network is operated jointly with more than 50 international partners and in 2014 consists of about 80 active stations on all continents, but concentrated in Europe and the Mediterranean region as well as in the Indian Ocean. Station operation is mostly performed by local partners with GFZ guidance and logistic support, allowing the global network to be well-advanced technically while still extremely cost-effective. All stations are equipped with broad-band sensors (generally STS-2) that allow resolution of the complete seismic spectrum from small high-frequency local earthquakes to the largest global earthquakes. Data from all stations are freely redistributed in real-time for earthquake monitoring and tsunami warning centers immediately after acquisition at the GEOFON data centre via wired or satellite links. Archived data is also available. GEOFON is part of the Modular Earth Science Infrastructure (MESI) housed at GFZ.

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Helmholtz-Centre Geesthacht, Centre for Materials and Coastal Research (HZG)

How are our coasts changing? How can we assess climate change? How can we conserve raw materials and energy? How do new materials assist us in medicine? Approximately one thousand employees at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Centre for Materials and Coastal Research are working on providing answers to such questions.

A Glance into Coastal Research at HZG

Current Topics in Coastal Research

Coastal Research:

  • Coastal researchers study the interactions between land, sea and humans. Primary questions that concern coastal regions worldwide arise, for example, due to climate change, alterations in the cycling of materials or human activity.
  • Concentrating mainly on the North Sea, The Institute of Coastal Research develops observational technology, models and analyses to generate a better understanding of the natural processes and the effects of human influence on the coasts.
  • Coastal research takes into consideration scientific processes and their regional and global characteristics within the context of socio-economic conditions. Such an approach supports the sustainable development and management of coastal regions.

The COSYNA Research Platform
HZG's Institute of Coastal Research operates COSYNA (Coastal Observing System for Northern and Arctic Seas), one of the most comprehensive monitoring systems worldwide. This measuring network with its numerous measuring instruments and observation platforms, in combination with computer simulations, delivers continuously updated descriptions and predictions of the environmental conditions in the North Sea. HZG handles its complex research endeavors within strong networks and partnerships from both the scientific and commercial sectors. Within the framework of COSYNA, HZG cooperates with numerous partners from research and government agencies. National and international research projects, institutions and firms use the freely available data and the existing infrastructure.

HZG - Science Creates Benefits
Through research and development of coastal and material sciences, the Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht develops new insights, gives impetus to innovative processes and helps clarify pressing societal, scientific and economic questions. HZG employs approximately one thousand individuals at their locations in Geesthacht and Teltow in the areas of material sciences, regenerative medicine and coastal research.

 

ESKP Research Topic:
Climate Change

Helmholtz-Centre Geesthacht, Centre for Materials and Coastal Research (HZG)

Contact the HZG

Helmholtz-Centre Geesthacht, Centre for Materials and Coastal Research (HZG)
Max-Planck-Straße 1
21502 Geesthacht

Dr. Torsten Fischer
Head of the public relations department

Phone:
+49 (0)4152 87-1677
Mail:
torsten.fischer@hzg.de
Web:
http://www.hzg.de

Helmholtz-Centre Geesthacht, Centre for Materials and Coastal Research (HZG)

Pressemitteilungen

Helmholtz-Centre Geesthacht, Centre for Materials and Coastal Research (HZG)

Partners

Climate Service Center
The Climate Service Center Germany is an independent scientific entity based at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht (HZG), located in Hamburg. It was initiated in 2009 by the German Federal Government as part of the "Hightech-Strategy for protection against climate change". Since June 2014, the Climate Service Center is institutionalised on a permanent basis in the Helmholtz Association.

The Climate Service Center Germany offers products, advisory services and decision-relevant knowledge based on sound scientific knowledge in order to support government, administration and business in their efforts to adapt to climate change.

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Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT)

In October 2009, the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) was established by a merger of Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH and Universität Karlsruhe (TH). The KIT pursues both the mission of a university with teaching and research tasks and the mission of a national research center of the Helmholtz Association conducting program-oriented provident research. Within these missions, KIT is operating along the three strategic fields of action of research, teaching, and innovation. With about 9400 employees, including 6000 staff members in the science and education sector, and 24,500 students, KIT is one of the biggest research and education institutions in Europe

The research and development activities of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) are embedded in the superordinate program structure of the Hermann von Helmholtz Association of National Research Centers and concentrate on 13 programs in four research fields.

Research Field Energy
The KIT Renewable Energies Program focuses research and development on the topics biomass as chemical energy carrier and geothermal technologies. Within the framework of the European Fusion Programme, the Research Center's Nuclear Fusion Program addresses basic technical issues related to the development of a fusion power reactor. Research focuses on superconducting magnets, gyrotron development, the solid blanket, tritium technology, and materials research. The Nuclear Safety Research Program studies scientific aspects of the safety of nuclear reactors and the safety of nuclear waste disposal. Long-term maintenance and constant development of competence in nuclear engineering are required for the operation of nuclear reactors, the decommissioning of nuclear facilities, and the disposal of radioactive waste. The Efficient Energy Conversion and Use (REUN) Program covers the activities with respect to non-nuclear energy technology. In particular, it is focused on superconductivity, processes for energy-efficient conversion of fuel, the co-combustion of heterogeneous feedstocks and innovative processes based on microwave, micro process, and catalytic technologies. The interdisciplinary research programme "Technology, Innovation, and Society" was established to study aspects such as political and economic framework conditions, acceptance by the population, or ethical questions by systems analysis and socio-scientific approaches, mostly in close cooperation with the technical institutes at KIT.

Research Field Earth and Environment
The Programme "Atmosphere and Climate"investigates the Earth's atmosphere as the central component of the climate system with advanced technologies of observation and numerical modeling. The atmosphere is the primary driver of climate change, affecting living conditions on Earth, and in turn, it is strongly affected by climate change effects in the Earth system. Changes of climate, natural hazards, and air quality represent major challenges to humankind over many generations. Growing economies drive significant changes in atmospheric composition, with ramifications on the climate system, human health, water resources, ecosystems, and biodiversity. Global climate change results in regionally diverse modifications of the water cycle and affects extreme weather events, such as heat waves, severe droughts, tropical storms, or heavy precipitation. Global deterioration of air quality, water resources, ecosystems and biodiversity pose a threat to the well-being of humankind. While the overall increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations is being monitored by routine observations, and its principal drivers (e.g., global energy production, sources and sinks in oceans and biosphere) are reasonably well quantified, the level of understanding for other trace gases and for aerosol particles is much lower. Large uncertainties exist in the understanding of complex feedback mechanisms in the climate system, particularly with respect to aerosols and clouds, land-use/land-cover change, and the roles of reactive trace gases and of chemical and physical processes in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere.

Research Field Key Technologies
The BioInterfaces program brings together biologists, chemists, physicists, IT specialists, engineers, and material scientists with the common goal of controlling living systems, and bridges the gap between fundamental research and development of application-oriented technologies and products. The NANOMICRO: Science, Technology, Systems Program is dedicated towards research and development of quantum size effects and molecular building blocks, new and novel functional materials beyond IC-materials, reliable processing and characterisation technologies, new optical and photonic systems and energy storage systems. NANOMICRO operates the Karlsruhe Nano Micro Facility (KNMF). The Supercomputing Program focuses on linking innovative services with research-driven tasks. It investigates research-relevant issues in order to derive general and sustainable structures. These are made available to the entire KIT community and shall also be acknowledged and used by national and international partners. Apart from integration of supercomputers, clusters, and heterogeneous stores in distributed structures, the software of scientific applications is optimized such that supercomputers, grids, and clouds can be used efficiently.

Research Field Structure of Matter
Worldwide, the potential of astroparticle physics is estimated to be very high. On the international level, the Astroparticle Physics Program of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology is operating the KASCADE facility and is involved in the Pierre Auger Observatory for the investigation of cosmic radiation, the EDELWEISS experiment for direct search for dark matter and the KATRIN facility in neutrino physics. The Synchrotron Radiation ANKA Program is dedicated to improving the performance of medium-energy synchrotron radiation sources, in particular of ANKA (Angstroem source Karlsruhe), as well as to developing the superconducting mini undulator and establishing the synchrotron environmental laboratory. As one of eleven tier-1 centers worldwide the Grid Computing Centre Karlsruhe (GridKa), located at the Steinbuch Centre for Computing (SCC), is responsible for the storage and analysis of a significant part of data from the LHC experiments "ALICE", "ATLAS", "CMS" and "LHCb". Furthermore SCC provides compute and storage capacity for other high energy physics experiments as well as the astroparticle physics experiment "Auger".

ESKP Research Topic:
Natural Hazards Climate Change

Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT)

Contact the KIT

Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT)
Kaiserstraße 12,
76131 Karlsruhe

Margarete Lehné, M.A.
Deputy Head of Press Office

Phone:
+49 (0)721 - 608 21157
Mail:
margarete.lehne@kit.edu
Web:
http://www.kit.edu

Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT)

Pressemitteilungen

Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT)

Partners

Center for Disaster Management Risk Reduction Technology
The Center for Disaster Management and Risk Reduction Technology (CEDIM) is an interdisciplinary research center of the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT).

The Center for Disaster Management and Risk Reduction Technology (CEDIM) is an interdisciplinary research center in the field of disaster management by the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT). The main goal of CEDIM is to advance our scientific understanding of natural and man-made hazards, and to develop disaster management solutions for the early detection and reduction of the related risks.

Aim of the analyzes of CEDIM is to identify the key risk drivers and causes of disasters and to derive implications for loss reduction. CEDIM concentrates on disasters that are caused by hydro-meteorological (floods, storms) and geophysical (earthquakes, volcanic eruptions) extreme events and engages the approach of Forensic Investigations of Disasters. This new approach was launched by the international initiative "Integrated Research on Disaster Risk Initiative" (IRDR www.irdrinternational.org). It stands for more in-depth analysis of disasters and their causes. Characteristic for the forensic analysis of disaster by CEDIM is the near real-time analysis immediately after respectively during the disaster. The focus of the CEDIM analysis is on the interaction between (1) the natural event, (2) the technical installations, equipment and critical infrastructures, and (3 ) the social structures , institutional and self- protection capabilities. For the Forensic Disaster Analysis (FDA) CEDIM draws on his wide-ranging technical expertise and on already existing models and tools for the rapid assessment of damage and loss.

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South German Climate Office at the Karlsruhe Institute for Technology
The South German Climate Office selects and provides results of climate research. The regional focus is based on the expertise of institutes at the KIT and of associated partners in southern Germany.

We provide a link between research institutes and society. Requests are processed and user specific information on climate change is provided to interested parties from media, economy, politics, and public institutions.
We identify further research, which is communicated to competent research groups

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Scientists for Future (S4F)

Die Initiative besteht aus einem engeren Kreis von ca. 20 und einem weiteren Kreis von ca. 60 Menschen. Darunter sind erfahrene Wissenschaftler*innen der Klimaforschung, Nachhaltigkeitsforschung, Biodiversitäts- und Transformationsforschung, einschließlich IPCC und IPBES Autor*innen. Ab Mitte Februar wurde eine Stellungnahme ausgearbeitet und um Erstunterzeichnungen geworben. Das Ergebnis ist ein Gemeinschaftswerk, das von über 700 Wissenschaftler*innen als Erstunterzeichnende mit getragen wird. Ab 3.3.2019 wurde für eine breite Unterzeichnung geworben. Zum Zeitpunkt der Pressekonferenzen in Berlin, Wien und Graz am 12.3.2019 hatten mehr als 12.000 Wissenschaftler*innen unterzeichnet. Am 15.3.2019 wurde der neue Stand verkündet: 23.000 Unterzeichnende. Die Möglichkeit zur Unterzeichnung endete 10 Tage nach den Pressekonferenzen mit über 26.800 Unterzeichnungen. 

Zusätzlich zu der von den Unterzeichnenden unterschrieben Stellungnahme gibt es eine Sammlung wichtiger Fakten. Die Aussagen der Stellungnahme und der Fakten im Anhang basieren auf anerkannten Quellen. Das Literaturverzeichnis umfasst vier Seiten.

Das Gesamtteam (alphabetisch): Adina Arth, Alexander Graf, Alexander Grams, Alexander Neef, Alexandra-Maria Klein, Alfred Schumm, Alice Chodura, Anne Schierenbeck, Annemarie Botzki, Antje Fillbrandt, Arnulf Köhncke, Barbara Fischer, Barbara Platzer, Bernhard Steinberger, Carsten Neßhöver, Catherine Eckenbach, Christian Breyer, Christina Stacke, Christine Schmidt, Christoph Gerhards, Christoph Schneider, Claudia Michl, Claus-Heinrich Daub, Eckart von Hirschhausen, Felix Creutzig, Felix Ekardt, Felix Raulf, Florian Ziemen, Franz Ossing, Gerhard Schneider, Gerhard Wenz, Gesa Pauer, Gottfried Kirchengast, Gregor Hagedorn, Harald Mehling, Heike Hübener, Heiko Bozem, Helmut Selinger, Henning Krause, Holger Michel, Jakob Schweizer, Jan-Hendrik Schleimer, Janina Hesse, Javier Francisco Vallejo, Jens Clausen, Jens Jetzkowitz, Johannes Fischer, Johannes Schauer, Josef Zens, Judith N. Hardt, Julia Hertin, Julia Krohmer, Julia Thrul, Julia Wandt, Jürgen Blümer, Jürgen Scheffran, Karin Ammon, Katharina Staab, Katharina Theis-Bröhl, Kilian Hartmann, Kira Ludwig, Klaus Burmeister, Larissa Lachmann, Lea Schneider, Lena Reiber, Linda Mederake, Linus Mattauch, Luca Brunsch, Maja Göpel, Marco Springmann, Marianne Darbi, Marie-Luise Beck, Marion Schroedter-Homscheidt, Mark Lindert, Markus Quante, Markus Vossebürger, Marla Kaupmann, Martha Friedrich, Martin Ebert, Martin Hundhausen, Martin Krause, Martin Wittau, Martina Artmann, Matthias Glade, Matthias Stoll, Michael Krzyzek, Michael Mann, Michael Neuhaus, Michael Stöhr, Moritz Hallama, Moritz Koch, Norbert Pengel, Oliver Richters, Oliver Wagner, Patrick Vrancken, Peter Finke, Peter Grobe, Philipp Schönberger, Rainer Schulze-Pillot-Ziemen, Ralf Seppelt, Rebecca Freitag, Reinhold Leinfelder, Reto Knutti, Roland Weber, Saskia Knispel, Schnattinger Andrea, Seb Gatz, Sebastian Kempken, Sebastian Scholz, Silvio Schwarz, Sophie Lokatis, Stefan Heiland, Stefan Rahmstorf, Steffi Ober, Stephan Köster, Susanne Winter, Svea Busse, Thomas Hickler, Thomas Loew, Thomas Ronge, Thomas Vogt, Till Weyers, Tim Inhoff, Uli Spindler, Ute Döring, Volker Quaschning, Werner Aeschbach, Wolfgang Lucht. 

Textautoren:  Gregor Hagedorn, Thomas Loew, Sonia I. Seneviratne, Wolfgang Lucht, Marie-Luise Beck, Janina Hesse, Reto Knutti, Volker Quaschning, Jan-Hendrik Schleimer, Gottfried Kirchengast, Adina Arth, Christian Breyer, Alice Chodura, Jens Clausen, Felix Creutzig, Marianne Darbi, Claus-Heinrich Daub, Felix Ekardt, Johannes Fischer, Maja Göpel, Judith N. Hardt, Julia Hertin, Thomas Hickler, Heike Hübener, Jens Jetzkowitz, Arnulf Koehncke, Stephan Köster, Julia Krohmer, Helga Kromp-Kolb, Reinhold Leinfelder, Linus Mattauch, Linda Mederake, Michael Neuhaus, Stefan Rahmstorf, Christine Schmidt, Christoph Schneider, Gerhard Schneider, Ralf Seppelt, Uli Spindler, Marco Springmann, Katharina Staab, Thomas Stocker, Karl Steininger, Eckart von Hirschhausen, Susanne Winter, Martin Wittau, Josef Zens.

Koordination: Gregor Hagedorn und Thomas Loew.

Quelle: https://www.scientists4future.org/about/team/

Scientists for Future (S4F)

Kontakt

Scientists for Future (S4F)


Phone:
+49 30 2408 553
Mail:
kontakt@scientists4future.org
Web:
https://www.scientists4future.org/

Scientists for Future (S4F)

Pressemitteilungen

Scientists for Future (S4F)

Helmholtz-Center for Environmental Research (UFZ)

As an international competence centre for the environmental sciences, the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ) investigates the complex interactions between mankind and nature under the influence of global change.

The mission of the UFZ

As an international competence centre for the environmental sciences, the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ) investigates the complex interactions between mankind and nature under the influence of global change. In close cooperation with decision-makers and stakeholders, scientists at the UFZ develop system solutions to improve the management of complex environmental systems and to tackle environmental issues.

For example, we work on the management of water resources, the impacts of land use change on human landscapes and biodiversity, the impacts of chemicals in the environment and on human health as well as adaptation strategies for climate change.

Successful solutions require a solid scientific basis. But this is not sufficient. Environmental research, which is usually dominated by the natural sciences,
has to become increasingly linked to the human, social and legal sciences.

This is the challenge that we – the 1.100 people working at the UFZ – face.

It is our mission to suggest ways that ensure a balance between economic and societal development on the one hand and the long-term protection of our natural resource base on the other.

The UFZ´s research structure

Research at the UFZ is organized into 34 methodical competence centres, the so-called departments. The large number of departments underlines the large range of competences and approaches at the UFZ. The departments are organized into seven divisions, namely:

  1. Environmental Systems, Computation and Monitoring
  2. Water and Soil Sciences
  3. Terrestrial Ecology
  4. Environmental Technology
  5. Environmental Health
  6. Health Research
  7. Social Sciences

In terms of its fields of research the UFZ focuses on three core subject areas as well as three cross-sectional competence areas. These are assigned to the Helmholtz Research Fields of Earth and Environment (Research programme „Terrestrial Environment“ / accounting for 85 percent of UFZ resources), Health (Research Programme “Environmental Health“ / 8 percent) as well as Energy (Research Programmes „Renewable Energies“ and „Technology, Innovation and Society“ / 7 percent).

ESKP Research Topic:
Natural Hazards Climate Change Pollutants

Helmholtz-Center for Environmental Research (UFZ)

Contact the UFZ

Helmholtz-Center for Environmental Research (UFZ)
Permoserstraße 15
04318 Leipzig

Phone:
+49 (0)341 235-1269
Mail:
info@ufz.de
Web:
http://www.ufz.de

Helmholtz-Center for Environmental Research (UFZ)

Pressemitteilungen

Helmholtz-Center for Environmental Research (UFZ)

Partners

Advanced Remote Sensing – Ground Truth Demo and Test Facilities
In the past 10-15 years, satellite-based earth-observation technology has made enormous progress. Despite the immense progress, there are still several obstacles preventing an effective use of satellite borne data in environmental science. Substantial uncertainties in the interpretation of the remotely sensed data still exist. It is mandatory to develop new approaches of satellite data analysis in order to better translate the satellite signals for essential environmental variables. Through the extension of already existing Helmholtz observatories the new infrastructure of ACROSS will significantly contribute to close the satellite data validation gap. For this, ACROSS is organized in four thematic platforms: • Multi-scale Terrestrial Platform • Multi-scale Coastal Platform • Multi-scale Oceanic Platform • Multi-hazard Monitoring Systems

In the past ten to fifteen years, satellite-based Earth observation technology has made enormous progress. Today’s satellite-based sensors provide a wide range of spatial and temporal resolutions as well as highly valuable data sources to feed complex regional or global environmental model systems. Despite the immense progress in the use of satellite data, there are still several obstacles preventing effective use. The primary problem arises from the fact that the exact relation between the remotely sensed proxy (e.g., radiometric or spectral signal) and the environmental quantities and qualities of interest is very often not or only poorly known. As a consequence, substantial uncertainties exist in the interpretation of such remotely sensed data. Therefore, new approaches in satellite data analysis based on comprehensive verification concepts are necessary in order to better translate satellite signals for essential environmental variables of the Earth system. 

The Helmholtz Association operates several multi-objective observatories for environmental monitoring and research in Europe and its periphery (e.g., TERENO, OceanSITES, COSYNA, GCO-CA, PBO Turkey). These observatories provide long-term data for different environmental compartments at different spatial and temporal resolutions, including the geosphere, cryosphere, hydrosphere (including oceans), pedosphere, biosphere, and atmosphere. Through the extension of these Helmholtz observatories, the new ACROSS infrastructure will significantly contribute to close the satellite data validation gap and the observatories will serve as robust validation and calibration sites at different temporal and spatial scales.

At these extended sites ACROSS will:

  • Continuously collect data up to the landscape level which i) specifically refers to relevant surface processes and ii) relates to the signal recorded by the satellite, i.e., spectral and radiometric information;
  • Develop, test and approve innovative and transferable monitoring concepts and novel algorithms for the extraction of essential environmental parameters;
  • Provide high-quality data series to validate existing and newly developed concepts (e.g., inverse modelling, stochastic data fusion approaches) and upscaling theories to estimate effective parameters, fluxes, and state variables at various scales;
  • Support the development of forecasting and early warning systems in order to minimise the impact of extreme events (extreme weather events like floods and droughts, freshwater quality, desertification, earthquakes, landslides, tsunamis, etc.).

By relating ground truth data with satellite data, ACROSS will lay the foundations for overcoming technological and methodological challenges for the transfer of proxies remotely sensed by satellites into environmental parameters. Furthermore, the ACROSS infrastructure will be deployed to develop, improve and validate monitoring concepts which are likely to facilitate the future usage of satellite data. By closely linking the already existing observatories, ACROSS supports a better integration of Helmholtz activities across different marine, coastal and terrestrial systems. By combining the efforts, expertise and capabilities of nine Helmholtz Centres and their partners under the coordination of Helmholtz-Zentrum für Umweltforschung – UFZ and Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, we will create conditions to overcome still existing limits in integrated environmental monitoring and research, e.g., coupling of Earth surface ecosystems and atmosphere, connection between terrestrial hydrosphere and estuaries/marine systems. Short-term products of ACROSS are innovative monitoring concepts, novel algorithms, and models for the interpretation of remotely sensed information and the prediction of key parameters and states of the Earth system.

In the medium to long term, ACROSS will generate highly integrated multi-scale data sets as a solid basis for the validation of scientific concepts and models. Thus, ACROSS serves as an important basis for GEMIS, the global integrated multi-parameter Earth monitoring and validation system planned by the Helmholtz Centres organized in the research field “Earth and Environment”.

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Climate Office for Central Germany
The Central German Climate Office provides information on the effects of climate change on the environment, land use and the society. It offers support and adaptation strategies.

Regional Impacts of Global Climate Change

The impacts of climate change will vary from region to region. Farmers, coastal engineers, urban planners and decision-makers from government and industry need first-hand information in order to be able to prepare themselves for climate change in their regions.

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